Lacan, Doyle, and Holmes: Men and the Feminine (Part 2 of 3)

Lacan presents a theory that, while engaging, relies on a relatively narrow-minded definition of feminine characteristics versus masculine characteristics. For Lacan, the feminine is a shadowy, deceptive form, both indefinable and irresistible. However, it is still a position of vulnerability, one that presents more risks than rewards. If a man falls into a ‘feminine’ role,Continue reading “Lacan, Doyle, and Holmes: Men and the Feminine (Part 2 of 3)”

Lacan, Doyle, and Holmes: Men and the Feminine (Part 1 of 3)

Playwright William Congreve penned the infamous phrase “Heaven has no rage like love to hatred turned/Nor hell a fury like a woman scorned” in 1697 (Moncur). Throughout literary history, the woman scorned has been a powerful antagonist, instigating trouble and woe for a story’s protagonist, often for the purpose of revenge. In its most simplistic sense,Continue reading “Lacan, Doyle, and Holmes: Men and the Feminine (Part 1 of 3)”

Books Connect the Human Race (Part 2 of 2)

Nevertheless there must be something more to the book mystery. Why not just go out and travel the world if discovery and experience are so important to you? Another dimension of the allure of the published word is the effort involved in reading and the lust for cognizant activity. The act of reading is anContinue reading “Books Connect the Human Race (Part 2 of 2)”

You Can’t Run Away Forever: Confronting a Dark Past (Part 2 of 2)

Joseph Flora, a university professor, once included Shane in a course he conducted on American literature. He found the student’s aversion to the character of Shane interesting, and rationalized it with this statement: “At century’s end, in post-Vietnam America, believing in Shane’s kind of heroism and selflessness is hard, as is believing in a characterContinue reading “You Can’t Run Away Forever: Confronting a Dark Past (Part 2 of 2)”

You Can’t Run Away Forever: Confronting a Dark Past (Part 1 of 2)

Former president Lyndon B. Johnson once said, “We can draw lessons from the past, but we cannot live in it;” he would certainly know something about regretting the past. Among his many acts as President, he is remembered by most for escalating American involvement in the Vietnam War, from 16,000 American soldiers in 1963 toContinue reading “You Can’t Run Away Forever: Confronting a Dark Past (Part 1 of 2)”