“The Second Greatest Force in the Universe” – Ownership of Property and Personhood in the 19th Century (Part 1 of 3)

Walter Lippmann, the famous American reporter who was among the first people to introduce the concept of the Cold War, once said that “Private property was the original source of freedom.  It still is its main bulwark”. From the earliest days of enlightenment philosophy, the right to own property and the effects that such ownershipContinue reading ““The Second Greatest Force in the Universe” – Ownership of Property and Personhood in the 19th Century (Part 1 of 3)”

Freedom Through Language in The Awakening

Ingrid Bengis, a writer best known for her collection of essays on love, hate, titled Combat in the Erogenous Zone, once said that “Words are a form of action, capable of influencing change” (Quotationspage). In her most controversial novel, The Awakening, Kate Chopin was well aware of the power that words can exert over theContinue reading “Freedom Through Language in The Awakening”

A Reputation of Deceit: How Moll Flanders Beat the Gossip Game (Part 2 of 2)

However, it wasn’t always clear to Moll Flanders how to build up a good and useful reputation such as this. When her second husband, a thief, flees the country, Moll finds herself entirely at loose ends for perhaps the first time in her life. She seems to instinctively know that if she stays where, andContinue reading “A Reputation of Deceit: How Moll Flanders Beat the Gossip Game (Part 2 of 2)”

A Reputation of Deceit: How Moll Flanders Beat the Gossip Game (Part 1 of 2)

Literary works of the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries tend to depend, in one way or another, on reputation. In works such as Samuel Richardson’s Pamela or Eliza Haywood‘s Fantomina, the issue of good and bad reputation informs the main conflict of the story. It is important to note, however, that the reputation atContinue reading “A Reputation of Deceit: How Moll Flanders Beat the Gossip Game (Part 1 of 2)”

Feminism and the Figure of the Fembot (Part 6.2 of 7)

VI. Phyllis, Ellery, and Landon: The Transgression/Failure of the Fembot However, in Landon’s reading of Adventures of the Artificial Woman, the critic believes the subversion comes not from Phyllis’ status as a machine performing femininity, or even as a machine developing its own consciousness, but from her rejection of the male authority of her maker.Continue reading “Feminism and the Figure of the Fembot (Part 6.2 of 7)”